Categories
Cryptography

Improving storage of password-encrypted secrets in end-to-end encrypted apps

Many apps with client-side encryption that use passwords derive both encryption and server authentication keys from them.

One such example is Bitwarden, a cross-platform password manager. It uses PBKDF2-HMAC-SHA-256 with 100,000 rounds to derive an encryption key from a user’s master password, and an additional 1-round PBKDF2 to derive a server authentication key from that key. Bitwarden additionally hashes the authentication key on the server with 100,000-iteration PBKDF2 “for a total of 200,001 iterations by default”. In this post I’ll show you that these additional iterations for the server-side hashing are useless if the database is leaked, and the actual strength of the hashing is only as good as the client-side PBKDF2 iterations plus an AES decryption and one HMAC. I will also show you how to fix this.

Categories
Cryptography

Why password peppering in Devise library for Rails is not secure

Devise is a popular authentication solution for Ruby on Rails. Most web apps need some kind of authentication system for user accounts and Devise allows adding one with just a few lines of code. This is great for security — if all the developers need to do is to plug a third-party library, there are fewer chances to make a mistake. This, however, requires that the library itself is implemented correctly, which is, unfortunately, not the case for many of them.

Categories
Cryptography

Mac developers: don’t use AQDataExtensions

AQDataExtensions is an NSData category developed in 2005 by Lucas Newman and distributed with AquaticPrime framework which “allows for easily encrypting and decrypting NSData objects with AES/Rijndael (i.e. the Advanced Encryption Standard)“.

The methods are:

- (NSData*)dataEncryptedWithPassword:(NSString*)password
- (NSData*)dataDecryptedWithPassword:(NSString*)password

Unfortunately, AQDataExtensions has the following weaknesses:

  1. Weak key derivation function.
  2. No authentication.
  3. Weak random numbers.